Spanish Steps - Piazza di Spagna, Rome

3.5 out of 5 stars 305 Reviews

Piazza di Spagna 09083881200
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  • chattygirl7491's Profile Photo

    sooo crowded

    by chattygirl7491 Written Feb 10, 2016

    I'd never heard of the Spanish Steps and it was super crowded. We didn't stay long .. didn't feel like fighting the crowd. Rome had so many amazing things to see and do .. didn't see the allure of this area.

    Address: Piazza di Spagna

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  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    Spanish Steps ??

    by traveloturc Updated Nov 23, 2015

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    First of all this steps has nothing to do with SPAIN.They are build and founded by French people in order to link The Trinita Church uphill (build by Louis XII for some people in 1502 for some in 1495 to celebrate his invasion of Naples) to the Spanish Plaza...What s the relation with spanish ..because Spanish Ambassador to the Holy See had his embassy here. The square, at that time, was considered Spanish territory.The square and the church is linked by the monumental Spanish steps, built between 1723-1726 designed by Francesco de Sanctis. This steps are always populated and I presume because this is an ideal place to take pictures for the groups due to physical situations of the steps.

    Address: Piazza di Spagna

    Spanish steps
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  • xaver's Profile Photo

    Trinità dei Monti

    by xaver Updated Oct 7, 2015

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    The church of Trinità de Monti and the convent next to it were built for the will of Sanit Francesco di Paola to host the new order of Minimi. The church was finished in 1519 and the convent in 1550. The church was then extended by Giacomo della Porta in 1584 and just 3 years later, Domenico Fontana, realised the steps that bring to the church, not the spanish steps that links the church and the spanish square. Today around the square you find painters and street artists.

    Address: Piazza di Spagna

    view from Trinit�� de monti

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  • xaver's Profile Photo

    Piazza di Spagna

    by xaver Written Oct 7, 2015

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    Spanish steps have been built in 1723-1725 with the aim of connecting the church Trinità dei Monti that was under the patronage of the king of France and the spanish square below.
    The Spanish steps unique design and elegance has made it a popular place for artists, painters and poets who were attracted to the place which inspired. The artist’s presence attracted many beautiful women to the area, hoping to taken as models. This in turn, attracted rich Romans and travelers. After a short time, the steps were crowded with people of all kinds of backgrounds. This tradition, of the Spanish Steps as a meeting place, still resists.

    Address: Piazza di Spagna

    Directions: Metro stop Spagna

    spanish steps Street artists
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    Spanish Steps

    by apbeaches Updated Aug 20, 2015

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    "With its characteristic butterfly plan, the Piazza di Spagna is one of the most famous images in the world, as well as being one of the most majestic urban monuments of Roman Baroque style. In the Renaissance period, the square was the most popular tourist attraction in the city: it attracted artists and writers alike and was full of elegant hotels, inns and residences.

    At the end of the seventeenth century, it was called Trinità dei Monti, after the church that dominates the square from above, but it was later given the name we know today after the Spanish Ambassador who lived there.

    At the foot of the stairs, you will find the famous Barcaccia Fountain, the work of Pietro Bernini and his son, Gian Lorenzo. The latter went on to become the creator of some of the most important masterpieces of Baroque art in the city, including the renowned baldachino of St. Peter's Basilica. With its characteristic form of a sinking ship, the fountain recalls the historic flood of the River Tiber in 1598 and refers to a folk legend whereby a fishing boat carried away by the flood of the river was found at this exact spot. In reality, the sinking boat was ably invented by Bernini to overcome a technical problem due to low water pressure. The sun and bee ornamentation is a symbol of the Barberini family and a reference to Pope Urban VIII who commissioned the work. However, the main attraction of the square has to be the spectacular staircase of Trinità dei Monti.
    Built on the request of Innocent XII and created by Francesco De Sanctis in the eighteenth century, this daring architectural feat with its ramps and stairs that intersect and open out like a fan definitively provided a solution for connecting the square and the Trinità Church above, providing the city with a particularly intriguing attraction that is adored by tourists from all over the world. The sight of the square in spring should not be missed, when the ramps of the staircase are literally covered with flowers and the architecture is playfully lost beneath a magnificent array of colour."

    From: http://www.italyguides.it/en/lazio/rome/squares-and-fountains/spanish-steps

    Address: Piazza di Spagna, 00187 Roma, Italy

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Crowded, but in a nice way!

    by Jefie Updated Dec 19, 2014

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    While some parts of Rome tend to get unpleasantly overcrowded, that's not the way I felt about Piazza di Spagna at all. While this seems to be the city's most popular square, the crowd here only made for a fun, lively atmosphere. Perhaps it helps that most people had taken a seat on the Spanish steps to chat, take pictures, or simply watch people go by on the piazza down below. This large stairway is made up of 135 steps and it was completed in 1725 on Pincian Hill. From Piazza di Spagna, it leads up to the church of Trinita dei Monti. Unfortunately, the facade of the church was being restored when we were there so I couldn't quite get that perfect shot you often see on postcards of the city, but I still enjoyed walking up and down the steps, checking out the different points of view it offers from its terraces. Another popular spot for pictures on Piazza di Spagna is by the fountain called "Fontana della Barcaccia". The fountain is one of Bernini's earliest works, sculpted with the help of his father. It looks like a sunken ship and is meant to represent a particularly bad flooding that occurred in 1598 when the Tiber swelled and left Piazza di Spagna under about 1 m of water.

    Address: Piazza di Spagna

    People seating on the Spanish steps Bernini's Fontana della Barcaccia View of Piazza di Spagna from the Spanish Steps
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  • JulietaA's Profile Photo

    A great trip with my friend Cecilia in Rome !!

    by JulietaA Written Nov 28, 2014

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    A great trip with my friend Cecilia in Rome !! A very beautiful city with a very favorable climate all week. We receive from graphic designers and decided to celebrate it in a great trip! We went to Rome invited by a friend who lives there and DJ! We visited their beautiful cityscapes. To get fast, we decided to go by air. We flew, obviously, by Aerolineas Argentinas flew very comfortable, cheap and punctual !!! We arrived early and went straight to the hotel and leave everything to maximize the sun had and never miss a single minute! Very nice and elegant hotel. People seemed very friendly and fun! We toured the entire city and all cultural wonders it has to offer visitors! In summary a great time together :)! A greeting! PS: very romantic nightlife in Rome !!! Super recommended !!

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  • GracesTrips's Profile Photo

    Spanish Steps in the Piazza di Spagna

    by GracesTrips Updated Nov 2, 2014

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    You immediately notice the beautiful, fushia azaleas in pots. A magnificent church is located at the top of the steps. If you go early in the morning like we did (around 8:30am), not many people are there and it is a beautiful scene as the morning sunlight hits the street and the horse carriages are preparing to give rides for the day.

    We went into the church, Trinità dei Monti, and there was an early morning service going on. The music was like a Latin chant as words were spoken and the chanting was sung. It was chilling to listen to. No musical instruments and the echo of the voices from the acoustics in the church were amazing. I could listen to this the entire day by after 10-15 minutes, it ended.

    Address: $s4Piazza di Spagna

    Inside the Trinit�� dei Monti church My boyfriend on the steps
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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    World's passerelle

    by solopes Updated Oct 2, 2014

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    When the subject is fashion, those steps are in everybody's memories. That's why, after seeing the Pope, everybody must go there.

    As a matter of fact, the local is not particularly attractive, specially knowing that it has Rome around it, but... who cares? You have to go there.

    Ok, we did, fortunately skipping the nearby shops.

    Rome - Italy
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  • brendareed's Profile Photo

    Spanish Steps

    by brendareed Written Jun 2, 2014

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    Sorry, but I just don’t see the attraction in the Spanish steps. They seem overstated and overcrowded. Maybe back in the day when Keats and Shelley were there the steps were special, but even Charles Dickens recorded that the steps were crowded back then!

    The steps were built in 1723 to link the Piazza di Spagna and the church at the top (Trinita dei Monti and the Pincio). In the spring time there are large pots of azaleas adorning the 137 steps and there are nice houses on either side. But if you can’t get through all the people sitting on the steps, what is the point?

    We walked past the Spanish steps during our stay in Rome – took one look at the crowds (even for February it was crowded – can’t imagine it in the middle of summer) and walked away. Maybe I just don’t like crowds, maybe I just didn’t stay around to experience whatever magic these steps have to offer. All I saw were loud tourists and the potential for pickpockets and scammers. No, thank you.

    I’m usually very positive on my travels – but this was just one place I didn’t get. The only positive thing I found was the public bathrooms nearby (to the left of the steps as you look at them)!

    Address: Piazza di Spagna

    Directions: between the Piazza di Spagna and the church of the Trinita dei Monti and the Pincio; if you can't find them, just ask anyone - they'll know where they are (plus there are signs pointing the way).

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  • egonwegh's Profile Photo

    Step right up - Spanish Steps

    by egonwegh Updated Jun 1, 2014

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    I climbed just a few steps. Then I asked my colleague Harrie to take my picture. Fortunately, he heeded to my request. Since this was not his first visit to Rome (and the Spanish Steps), he also pointed out the house on the right, where the poet Keats used to live.

    Address: Piazza di Spagna

    Rome, Spanish Steps
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  • illumina's Profile Photo

    Piazza di Spagna and the Spanish Steps.

    by illumina Updated May 29, 2014

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    Piazza di Spagna is so-called becuase there has been a Spanish Embassy here since the 17th century. However, the French owned the land around the Trinita dei Monti convent, and built the steps in petty rivalry over the right to pass through the square - quite ironic that their steps are now named after their rival country.

    The steps are perpetually covered with tourists, as is the Barcaccia fountain of Bernini in the centre of the square.

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    The most monumental steps of Rome.

    by breughel Updated Feb 15, 2014

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    Best known and overcrowded by tourists is the Scalinata della Trinata dei Monti starting at the piazza di Spagna.

    Twenty years ago I visited the steps in May, best time when there are azalea flowers all over the stairs. I didn't try it again these last twenty years because there are more tourists than flowers on the steps.
    Avoid if you have, even a very slight, tendency to agoraphobia!

    Most tourists call the monument "Spanish steps" what might offend the French because the terraced garden stairs were paid by them as they were a project from Cardinal Mazzarin who had planned to erect at the top an equestrian statue of his King Louis XIV. But the Popes did not like the idea of such statue!
    Finally the 138 steps linked the Bourbon Spanish Embassy (at the Piazza di Spagna) and the Trinita dei Monti church that was under the patronage of the Bourbon Kings of France. The decoration of the steps shows many French royal "Fleur de Lys" emblems.

    The Romans diplomatically call the steps the "Scalinata". I do the same because "When in Roma do …"
    This proverb as such is not from the Romans who spoke Latin, if I remember well, but from the English around 1600 inspired by a letter from St Augustine to bishop Januarius around 390 AD:
    "Cum Romanum venio, ieiuno Sabbato; cum hic sum, non ieiuno: sic etiam tu, ad quam forte ecclesiam veneris, eius morem serva, si cuiquam non vis esse scandalum nec quemquam tibi."
    I presume no translation is needed.

    Address: Piazza di Spagna

    Scalinata around 1850 - No tourists, wonderful!
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  • gordonilla's Profile Photo

    Spanish Steps

    by gordonilla Written Feb 9, 2014

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    I have to admit, that I was a little unimpressed by this tourist site. I had not expected anything and I sadly got that - nothing special. It was January and it was not so busy. I am sure in the summer with the heat and a blue sky it will be much better.

    There is a fairly good selection of artists sitting at the top of the steps opposite the church at the top.

    Address: Piazza di Spagna

    Website: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_Steps

    View (1) View (2) View (3) View (4) View from The Keats-Shelley House

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  • goodfish's Profile Photo

    Trinità dei Monti: Trinity on the Mount

    by goodfish Updated Feb 7, 2014

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    This poor church has had a kajillion shots taken of its face but hardy any of what’s behind the front door so here is what that looks like.

    Located in Italy, at the top of Spanish Steps owned by France, this is one confusing piece of real estate. And it’s not really very ancient (late 16th century), fancy or loaded with sculptures or frescoes by killer Italian artists. But if you’re going to stagger up ALL those steps to get a look down at the piazza from the summit, it’s as good a place as any to catch your breath...or have a heart attack within last-rites range.

    What we have here is an unassuming nave with a nicely arched but undecorated ceiling, hint of a screen halfway between, and the requisite side chapels. The chapels are more lavishly decorated with paint, the most notable of which are four frescoes dabbled by a student of Michelangelo’s who employed some of his mentor's sketches. That’s Mike himself peering out at you rather crossly from the right side of Daniele da Volterra’s "Assumption of the Virgin" (not shown here). The furrow in his brow would be even deeper had he known that his pupil would later take on a commission to cover - with fig leaves and drapery - the naughty bits of the master’s Sistine Chapel.

    The rest of the works are unremarkable but a pleasant browse. The church may also be reached from the top, without so much huffing and puffing, from Via Sistina. See this website for visiting info:

    http://www.060608.it/en/cultura-e-svago/luoghi-di-culto-di-interesse-storico-artistico/chiese-cattoliche/ss-trinita-dei-monti.html

    Address: Piazza di Spagna/Piazza Trinità dei Monti

    Directions: VILLA BORGHESE AREA: The church/piazza is at the top of the Spanish Steps and near the southernmost point of the park.

    Website: http://www.060608.it/en/cultura-e-svago/luoghi-di-culto-di-interesse-storico-artistico/chiese-cattoliche/ss-trinita-dei-monti.html

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