Arc de Triomphe, Paris

4.5 out of 5 stars 402 Reviews

Place Charles de Gaulle, 75008 Paris, France +33 1 55 37 73 77
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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    L'Arc de Triomphe

    by Gypsystravels Updated Jun 22, 2015

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    L'Arc and the place Charles-de-Gaulle which surrounds it together form one of Paris' most famous landmarks. Twelve avenues radiate from the arch which explains why it is also called place de l'Etoile (etoile=star).

    The arch commemorates Nepolean's victories evoking at the same time imperial glory and the fate of the Unknown Solider, whose tomb lies beneath. A remberance ceremony is held here every year on the 11th of November.

    If you decide to climb to the top of the arch, you will be rewarded with some excellent views of the Champs Elysee and the Eiffel Tower. There is a small museum detailing construction of the arch as well as other significant information.

    Currently the fee to visit the top of the Arc is 9€ for Adults for more information about operating hours and group fees, check out their website.

    This is one of the landmarks covered with the Museum Pass.

    Arc view from Champs E'lysse A night time view of the impressive structure One of the friezes on the arch Champs Elyesse Sacre Coure and Montmartre in the distance
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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    The triumph of cars over people

    by Nemorino Updated May 1, 2015

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    The Arc de Triomphe was commissioned by the Emperor Napoléon I in 1806 to celebrate the triumph of his armies over the rest of Europe in the early nineteenth century, particularly his triumph over the Russian and Austrian Empires at the Battle of Austerlitz in 1805.

    In recent decades, however, the Arch has merely served to demonstrate the triumph of cars over people. Cars have unlimited rights to careen around the circle that surrounds the Arch, where twelve major streets come together. People, if they want to visit the Arch, can only reach it by going through an underground tunnel like rats or moles.

    Location, aerial view and photo of the Arch of Triumph on monumentum.fr.

    Update 2012: I have now added four more photos: one of the sign showing people how to reach the Arc de Triomphe without being killed, one showing the entrance to the tunnel, one showing people in the tunnel and one showing traffic from inside the circle.

    Next review from June 2012: From the top of the Arc de Triomphe

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  • grayfo's Profile Photo

    L'Arc de Triomphe

    by grayfo Updated Apr 12, 2015

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    The Arc de Triomphe is positioned in the centre of 12 Avenues at the end of the Champs Elysee. Built by Napoleon after his victory at Austerlitz, it was not finished until 1836. Engraved around the top of the Arch are the names of major victories won during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods. The names of other victories, as well as those of generals, are on the inside walls. Beneath the Arch is the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and eternal flame commemorating the dead from the two world wars. In 1970 the Place de L’Etoile was officially named Charles de Gaulle after France’s late resistance leader and state president. There is a lift that takes visitors to the attic, where there is a small museum which contains large models of the Arc and tells its story from the time of its construction, a further 46 steps are required to be climbed to reach the top.

    April to September: 10:00 am to 11:00 pm
    October to March: 10:00 am to 10:30 pm

    Cost: April 2015
    Adults: 8.00 EUR
    Children (Under 17): Free

    July 1982

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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Impressive

    by solopes Updated Mar 29, 2015

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    The Arc de Triomphe is one of the most famous monuments in Paris. It was commissioned in 1806 after the victory at Austerlitz by Emperor Napoleon I at the peak of his fortunes.

    Laying the foundations alone took two years, and in 1810 when Napoleon entered Paris from the west with his bride Archduchess Marie-Louise of Austria, he had a wooden mock-up of the completed arch constructed.

    The architect Jean Chalgrin died in 1811, and the work was taken over by Huyon. During the Restoration, construction was halted and would not be completed until the reign of King Louis-Philippe, in 1833–36.

    The monument stands 49.5 meters (165 ft) in height, 45 meters (148 ft) wide and 22 meters (72 ft) deep. It is the second largest triumphal arch, inspired by the Roman Arch of Titus.

    Paris - France Paris - France Paris - France Paris - France
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  • Sienlu's Profile Photo

    Arc de Triomphe

    by Sienlu Written Nov 30, 2014

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    L' Arc de Triomphe Paris was built between 1806 and 1836. Even though many changes through the years, the Arch still retains the essence of the original concept which was a powerful, unified ensemble.

    The Arc de Triomphe stands at the centre of the Place Charles de Gaulle, also known as the "Place de l'Étoile". It’s located at west end of Champs-Élysées.

    The triumphal arch is in honor of those who fought for France, in particular, All the names of generals who fought in wars are engraved on the inside. There are inscriptions in the ground underneath the vault of the arch which include the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from World War I where the Memorial Flame burns and have made the Arc de Triomphe Paris a revered patriotic site.

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  • TammyS1964's Profile Photo

    Be careful of the round about at the Arc

    by TammyS1964 Written Nov 2, 2014

    The Arc was truly a sight to see. We walked down the very famous street Champs Elysees, past shops we certainly could not afford but found some other we could. As women, we were very excited to say we purchased such and such ave de Champs Elysees. We thought it was interesting there was a McDonalds near the arc, so of course we had to try it. It was 2 floors, that was new for us to see. And the food, you may love it, but its certainly not like a mcdonalds here. As you reach the Arc, BE VERY CAREFUL, traffic will not yield to you. Other than its size it wasn't as I expected but after reading the history and being able to go into the arc, it was a remarkable piece of history. It's something everyone should see, but don't lose too much sleep if you miss it, as there are so many other things that will just take your breath away in Paris.

    This is the ceiling of the arc, just beautiful. The arc has many cars traveling around it, be safe Next to it I look even smaller It doesn't all show, but the carvings are great
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  • kahnjetta's Profile Photo

    Pure Beauty

    by kahnjetta Updated Oct 20, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Arc de Triomphe Paris, the most monumental of all triumphal arches, was built between 1806 and 1836. The Arc de Triomphe is located in the center of the Place Charles de Gaulle, also known as the "Place de l'Étoile". The style, comes from the 19th century. You can look at millions of pictures, but you need to see it for yourself. I fell in love with Paris back when I was in high school, which was a long time ago. It is open from April 1 to September 30: 10 a.m.-11 p.m. From October 1 to March 31: 10 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Prices, vary depending if you take a guided tour. One of the best days of the year to visit the Arc is July 14th, Bastille Day. Enjoy the amazing parade, and my favorite people watching.

    Love it:)) So happy to be in Paris
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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Useful Information

    by solopes Updated Sep 14, 2014

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    The Arc de Triomphe is a monument in Paris, France, that stands in the centre of the Place Charles de Gaulle, also known as the Place de l'Étoile (Star Square).

    It is at the western end of the Champs-Élysées. The arch honors Napoleon kings. Inside and atop the arc there are all of the names of generals and wars fought. Underneath is the tomb of the unknown soldier from World War I.

    But... Didn't you already really know that?

    Paris - Arc du Triomphe
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  • GracesTrips's Profile Photo

    If able bodied, you have to make this trek!

    by GracesTrips Updated Aug 28, 2014

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    It seemed to be a never ending climb up the Arc de Triomphe but once reaching the top, completely out of breath - it was worth it. The view from above overlooking Paris was unbelievable! I took several memorable photos from here.

    What a climb!
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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    The Arc di Triomphe

    by IreneMcKay Written Jun 29, 2014

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    The Emperor Napoleon ordered the construction of the Arc de Triomphe in 1806. The arch was built to honor the Grande Armee of France which at that time had conquered most of Europe and was considered invincible.

    The Arc de Triomphe cost 9.3 million French francs to build.Under the vault of the arch are written the names of 128 battles and 558 generals who fought in them.The arch was finished in 1836, fifteen years after Napoleon's death in exile.

    L'Arc de Triomphe
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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Standing on top of the Arc de Triomphe

    by Dabs Updated Apr 17, 2014

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    Last visit April 2014

    After strolling up the Champs Elysses, head over to the Arc de Triomphe, climb up the 284 steps to find an amazing view of Paris and watch all the traffic driving round and round and round from the 12 streets radiating out from the Place Charles de Gaulle where the Arc sits. There must be an entirely different set of rules for this roundabout as none of the traffic seemed to be doing what it was supposed to, drive here at your own risk!

    It was commissioned in 1806 by Napoleon, shortly after his victory at Austerlitz, but it was not finished until 1836. He originally wanted it on the site of the Bastille to the east of Paris so his soldiers could "march home through arches of victory", but eventually this site was chosen.

    There are four relief sculptures at the base of the Arc commemorating The Triumph of 1810, Resistance, Peace and The Departure of the Volunteers, more commonly known as La Marseillaise. Beneath the Arc is the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and eternal flame commemorating the dead of the two world wars.

    Entrance to the top of the Arc de Triomphe is included on the Paris Museum Pass. Do not stand in the ticket line to purchase tickets if you have the pass, this is one place the Paris Museum Pass always saves me time. And don't try to cross the traffic to get there, access is via an underground tunnel, the drivers have enough to worry about without tourists darting through traffic! The Arc is open past normal museum hours, until 10:30pm or 11pm, it's a nice place to visit both in the day and evening hours.

    Traffic every which way View from the Arc de Triomphe
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  • gwened's Profile Photo

    Arc de Triomphe

    by gwened Written Feb 25, 2014

    this is enblematic of Paris and great views from the top too, if not too high, great underground passage of the 12 avenues radiating from it. The thrill is to drive it and I always do, see my tip on that.

    The most important dates to remember are
    1806, February 26, yes its 207 years already! began the construction of this magnificient arch building. The work were ordered by Napoleon Iér, to honor the great army he led, or the Grande Armée. Following antiquity models the arch was built with 50 meters high and 45 meters wide, and 22 meters deep.
    The work was stopped during the downfall of the empire and re started again in 1825.

    In 1836, July 29, the Arc de Triomphe will be finally finished and open by then king Louis-Philippe. The full name of arc de Triomphe de l'Etoile is simply better known as the arc de Triomphe by visitors and locals alike. It was and is located at the place de l'Etoile,overlooking the famous avenue des Champs-Elysées. On the opening day it marked the anniversary of the insurrection of the three glorious days of French history or the Trois Glorieuses.

    In November 11,1920, the inhumation of the unknown soldier was carried out here. The body of a French soldier Fallen at the First World War. It is in a chapel in the first floor (2nd) of the Arch to honor those youngsters who fell for a free France. It was later on inhumane in the vault undernearth the arc de triomphe. The soldier was chosen by a Young soldier of the honor guard , named , Auguste Thien, between 8 coffins of Fallen soldiers unidentified.

    The arch has great relief works of art, with detail battle history ,events in the history of France too numerous to mention here, just go see it,and tell them all.

    closer look at Arc de Triomphe Arc de Triomphe from Foch coming from ave Foch the Arc de Triomphe the Arc been renovated and heading to it!
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  • datapanik's Profile Photo

    Arc de Triomphe

    by datapanik Written Jan 16, 2014

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    The Arc de Triomphe stands at the centre of Place Charles de Gualle towards the western end of the Champs-Élysées. It is equally impressive by day or night and equally constant is the traffic that whizzes around it so please don't try to dodge the traffic to see it closer up, use one of the two underpasses instead! A combination of a lift and a flight of steps will take you to the top for panoramic views of Paris.

    The Arc de Triomphe at night
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  • beach7863's Profile Photo

    Arc de Triomphe

    by beach7863 Written Nov 15, 2013

    At the end of Champs Elysee you will find the Arc de Triomphe. We stood on the corner for awhile trying to figure out how to get across the traffic. Our guide book didn't mention how to get there. We crossed Champs Elysee and found an underground entrance avoiding all traffic. There are over 250 steps to climb to get to the top but you can see all around the city and look down the long streets that meet at the Arc.

    Pictures to follow soon

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  • goodfish's Profile Photo

    Arc de Triomphe de l'Etoile

    by goodfish Updated Apr 2, 2013

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    If you are doing the L'Axe Historique walk mentioned in my previous review, you'll run smack into this one. Arc de Triomphe de l'Etoile was one of Napoleon's additions to the axis and commemorates those who gave life and limb in the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars. It's the second-largest triumphal arch in the world (the largest is in North Korea) and anchors the middle of a star (etoile) of 12 avenues that radiate out from the center of Place Charles-de-Gaulle Etoile. The funeral procession for the Emperor himself passed beneath its arms, and the remains of French literary hero, Victor Hugo, rested here before his interment in the Pantheon. Today the arc embraces France's Tomb Of The Unknown Soldier and Eternal Flame. It is the beginning point of the annual Bastille Day parade, and finish line for the Tour de France.

    On top of the arc is a viewing platform that provides wonderful views of Champs Elysées and other avenues stretching away from the your perch high above the center of the square. You have to climb 284 steps to get there but the reward outweighs the effort!

    As this is one of the few attractions in Paris that is open late into the evening, it's a great one for visiting when other museums and churches have closed for the day. We unfortunately did our climb on a drizzly morning and didn't make it back for a nighttime perspective but c'est la vie: next trip!

    Entrance to the arc is included in the Paris Museum Pass, otherwise reference this website for hours, closings and entrance fees:

    http://arc-de-triomphe.monuments-nationaux.fr/

    And here is some nice background (don't use for entry fees/hours):

    http://www.arcdetriompheparis.com/

    Fun fact: In 1919, one daring (or crazy) Charles Godefroy flew his biplane under the Arc.

    Be aware: do NOT try to cross the traffic roundabout unless you have a death wish. Reach the thing in one piece via underground tunnel; there is one on the north side of the Champs Elysées and another on north side of Avenue de la Grande Armee. The Arc has an elevator for elderly or physically challenged visitors but it was out of service when we were there, and it accesses only the museum level. You must be able to climb a flight of 40 or so steps to the top viewing platform. Pedestrian tunnels reaching the arc also involve a fair amount of steps.

    Arc de Triomphe Eiffel from the top of the Arc Arc de Triomphe The way up Detail, Arc de Triomphe
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