Street Markets, Paris

23 Reviews

  • Real and painted flowers
    Real and painted flowers
    by Nemorino
  • Market stalls and bookshop
    Market stalls and bookshop
    by Nemorino
  • Fruits and vegetables
    Fruits and vegetables
    by Nemorino

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Marché des Enfants Rouges: Market of the Red Children (3rd)

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 22, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On the pleasant and lively street called Rue de Bretagne there is a covered market with the unusual name Marché des Enfants Rouges (Market of the Red Children).

    It turns out that this is the oldest market in Paris. It was created in the year 1615 during the reign of King Louis XIII as a shopping center for the Marais district, which at the time was a new and quite fashionable aristocratic quarter. The market originally had its own well for water and a stable for the horses.

    The name of the market came from a nearby orphanage (founded in 1534 by Marguerite de Navarre), where the children wore clothes which were red to show they had been donated by Christian charities.

    The market was closed for six years in the 1990s, and might have remained closed except for vigorous campaigning by the local inhabitants. It was re-opened in November 2000.

    My first photo shows the sidewalk of Rue de Bretagne with some market stalls on the left and a nice bookshop on the right. The main part of the market is behind the bookshop and is accessible through two gates on either side of the shop.

    Second photo: Fruits and vegetables on display in the covered market.

    Third photo: An unpretentious Lebanese restaurant at the edge of the market.

    Fourth photo: Real and painted flowers, and a look through one of the iron gates out onto the sidewalk.

    Fifth photo: Cafés near the market on Rue de Bretagne.

    Address: 39 Rue de Bretagne, 75003 Paris
    Directions: Location on the Vélib’ map
    Location, aerial view and photo on monumentum.fr
    Website: http://marchedesenfantsrougesfr.com/

    Next Paris review from June 2015: Grand Hôtel de l’Europe

    Market stalls and bookshop Fruits and vegetables Lebanese restaurant Real and painted flowers Caf��s on Rue de Bretagne

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  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    Christmas Market at Saint Lazare: For your December shopping

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Jul 18, 2013

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    I happened to be in Paris in mid-December and after leaving the Saint Lazare train station I could not go around the Christmas market at the station square.

    The traditional wooden stalls, like I know them from Germany created a cosy atmosphere.

    What to buy: A quick snack or some fun Christmas gift.

    Looking for a tie?
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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Brocante: Street Market on Boulevard Edgar Quinet

    by Nemorino Updated May 19, 2013

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    SPAM does not necessarily mean the same in French as in English. Though French computer-users may know the English word SPAM meaning unwanted junk e-mails, in French the letters S.P.A.M. are also used as the abbreviated name of the Société Parisienne d'Animation et de Manifestation, a society that organizes street markets (also known as brocantes) in Paris and vicinity.

    One such street market was going on in the middle strip of the Boulevard Edgar Quinet, right in front of my hotel, while I was there in May 2013. In my first photo, the big building in the background is the tallest building in Paris, the Montparnasse Tower (Tour Montparnasse).

    Second and third photos: At the street market, several small family upholstery businesses were represented, offering to renovate old chairs and other pieces of furniture: “Tapissiers de père en fils” = Upholsterers from father to son.

    Next review from May 2013: Foire de Paris

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  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    PET MARKET: PETS GALORE

    by alyf1961 Written May 11, 2012

    Sunday seems to be pet buying day for Parisians.

    We first found a little market selling all different types of animals, birds and fish as well as pet supplies.

    There were also many shops along the Seine between Notre Dame and Pont Neuf which were pet shops selling cats, dogs, fish, birds, reptiles and furry mammals.

    What to buy: EVERY TYPE OF PET AND PET PRODUCT

    What to pay: AVERAGE

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  • Gillybob's Profile Photo

    Sunday Morning Markets: Delights and bargains

    by Gillybob Written Sep 17, 2011

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    Located through the various Arrondissement of Paris, you will find Sunday morning markets. These markets sell everything from fruit and vegetables to wines and pastries, breads and cheeses to meats and candies. Alongside delicious items for the tummy, you will find household items and clothing.

    In the 15th Arrondissement, you will find a Sunday morning market located on Boulevard de Grenelle between the Metro stations of Le Motte-Picquet Grenelle and Dupleix below the overhead metro line.

    What to buy: Great cheese and wines from small vineyards. Delicious breads and pastries.

    What to pay: You can get some real bargains at these various markets.

    15th Arrondissement market Pastry stall
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  • walterwu's Profile Photo

    Street Bazaar: Here Today Gone Tomorrow

    by walterwu Updated Aug 29, 2011

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    We arrived in Paris on 14th July 2011 (Thursday) morning and proceeded to our hotel. After leaving our luggages at the hotel reception (too early to check in), we noticed that there was a street bazaar in the vicinity of the hotel.

    On sales were food, fruits stuff, clothing, souvenirs and many others. It seems to the mainly targeted at the locals since there were seafood, food and fruits stuff. Prices are displayed prominently in french.

    As it was our first morning in Paris and being Bastille Day, we thought we would move on to visit the main attractions first and come back the next day morning. In our home country, these sort of things would carry on until Sundays.

    How wrong we were

    Stalls Seafood on ice Crabs, Prawns and other seafood Souvenirs Stalls
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  • carolerica's Profile Photo

    the 77 markets of Paris: The food markets : a parisian experience

    by carolerica Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Markets are at the core of a parisian lifes: this is where we shop (if we have the time and the means) where we interact and exchange the latest gossips. Markets are the articulation of a parisian's everyday social life.

    There are no less than 77 food market in Paris, and a couple of flea markets too, but this tip is all about the food markets.

    This english-languaged web site lists every parisian food market, its address, and its opening days!

    What to buy: Food, food, food. Fresh vegetables and fruits, dairy products, fresh cheese, wonderfully roasted chicken, mountains of spices and candies, wines, yummy fresh fish caught during the day and brought directly from the coast, oysters... all your heart desires, and fresh!
    The availability of the produce depends, of course, on the seasons, but even if you're not tempted by anything, it's wonderful just to have a walk around, and see parisians shopping!

    What to pay: Depending on the market you are going to, you can expect to find very cheap prices, or on the contrary very expensive prices. It depends on the districs (or arrondissement), or if it's an "organic" market ( click here for a list of the organic market place)

    march�� / market
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  • shrimp56's Profile Photo

    Market streets and stores throughout the city: Flowers & plants for sale almost everywhere

    by shrimp56 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Parisians love their flowers and plants. This was taken at a shop selling various plants on the right bank near the Grand Boulevards, but you can find flowers everywhere in Paris. They make a nice hostess gift, but remember no chrysanthemums unless you are going to a funeral!

    What to buy: There is a language of flowers as the link below will explain -- it took designer Christian Lacroix to make carnations acceptable!

    What to pay: These plants seem to be around 4-5 euro.

    Flowers for sale near rue Cler -- 2005

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  • angiebabe's Profile Photo

    local markets: lovely Flowers for sale

    by angiebabe Written Sep 12, 2007

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    the local markets held weekly or twice weekly with stalls set up with things for sale that the locals might need or want - all those usual things such as fruit and veges, wine and cheese, olives and honey, seafood, bags and baskets - and beautiful flowers!!

    What to buy: Flowers!
    Your choice!

    What to pay: Prices are usually clearly displayed with handwritten signs telling you exactly how much what is!

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  • angiebabe's Profile Photo

    Fruit and veges at the local markets

    by angiebabe Written Sep 12, 2007

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    Saturday was this locality's local market - a number of locals with their shopping trundlers and buying up the produce.
    Meanwhile i had plenty of colourful photos to take, including people shots.
    Though we pretty much see fruit and vege and produce stalls with stuff for sale around most countries we travel to its places like these that we also get to the actual locals of where we are and what they are buying - and in their language!

    Makes interesting shopping and touristing i reckon!

    good looking cherries! shopping for fruit locals out fruit shopping fruit stalls at the local Saturday market
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  • ChartIt's Profile Photo

    Street Vendors: Mini Effiel Towers

    by ChartIt Written May 14, 2007

    Ok so all around the Effiel tower men sell the little miniture towers on big chains, for cheap. They are normally some form of cast metal. They look cheesy and tacky when you are there, but it was really the only thing i wanted from Paris. And as stupid and touristy as i felt, I have never once regreted buying it. So dont let it stop you!

    What to buy: Your own Effiel tower

    What to pay: they run, betweeen a Euro from some guys to 5 or 6 euro in a store.

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  • ay07115's Profile Photo

    Street merchants: Where to buy a souvenir

    by ay07115 Updated Mar 15, 2007

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    What to buy: You are under the Eiffel tower or in front of Notre Dame Cathedral and you want to buy a T-shirt or a keychain proving you've been there?

    What to pay: Take you're time. Do not rush to the first trade-cart. The closer you are to the "hot spot" the more expensive they are. If you go walk 300m further you will find the same things for 2/3 the price.

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    Street Markets and Grocery Markets: Eating on a Budget

    by painterdave Written Jan 21, 2007

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    If you are on a budget, you can cut corners by stopping in a local Parisian market or buying fresh food along the street. Every neighborhood has a street market, and you won't go hungry.
    You will find cheese shops, bakeries and lots of choices of beverages. Buying your food like this and picnicing along the way can save you a lot of money and be a lot of fun, too.
    There are many parks to visit at lunchtime no matter where in Paris you are. There is nothing like sitting on a park bench with your wine and cheese under a shady tree and people watching. Your feet will be tired from walking and you can reward yourself with some tasty treats from a bakery.
    Pictured below are photos of your average vegetable market along a typical street.

    What to buy: You can ask to sample some cheese at a local shop before buying.
    Wine is much cheaper out of a store than at a restaurant.
    Bakeries produce terrific breads.
    Local meats can be sliced for sandwiches.
    You can even get small salads and veggies as take out from the markets.
    Don't forget your corkscrew, napkins, can opener, churchkey (soda opener), litter bag, and pocket knife for cutting the bread and cheese.
    Enjoy.

    What to pay: So much cheaper than a restaurant.

    Get hungry
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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Place d'Aligre

    by sachara Updated Jun 4, 2006

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    In so many places in Paris you can find lovely and interesting markets. When I stayed in a hotel In the Bastille area, I visited the Marché d'Aligre not far from the place de la Bastille. It was a lovely market with a typical authentic atmosphere.

    At the Place d'Aligne has a vegetable and fruit market, but also a fleamarket. I enjoyed to stroll around for some time at this place. Except the market there were also some lovely shops around, like the boulangerie/bakery at the picture.

    Place d 'Aligre

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  • Aleyd's Profile Photo

    Markets by the Seine: Markets by the Seine

    by Aleyd Updated Dec 13, 2005

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    The street vendors sell paintings (of Paris, animals etc), prints, 2nd hand books (mostly French and English), souvenirs and more. With the Cathedral of Notre Dame as a backdrop it is a beautiful way to spend a relaxing afternoon. It is an ideal place to get presents for your family and friends. Unlike Montmartre, there were no artists painting when I was there in August 2005. Apparently the painting I bought was painted by an Art student as part of their course.

    What to buy: I was especially interested in purchasing an oil painting of a typical Parisian scene.

    What to pay: Prices vary quite significantly. The print I bought of Paris was E$2.00, the student oil painting I bought was E$15.00, and the cat painting I bought was E$30.00

    Aug 05 Aug 05 Aug 05 Aug 05
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